Wednesday, January 26, 2011

Lutheran (ELCA) Daily And Commemmorative/Festal Readings For Wednesday, 26 January

From, and

Daily and Commemmorative/Festal Readings:

Saints/Martyrs/Heroes/Feasts/Fasts to be observed/commemmorated/celebrated:  Timothy, Titus, and Silas, missionaries (Commemoration) W - ELCA,  Saint Titus, pastor (Lesser Festival) W - LCMS

Timothy (Greek: Τιμόθεος; Timótheos, meaning "honouring God" [1] ) was a first-century Jewish Christian bishop who died around the year 80. The New Testament indicates that Timothy traveled with Saint Paul, who was also his mentor. He is addressed as the recipient of the Epistles to Timothy.


Born c. AD 17

Died c. AD 80


Venerated in Roman Catholic Church

Eastern Orthodox Churches

Oriental Orthodoxy

Anglican Communion

Lutheran Church

Feast January 22 (Eastern Christianity)

January 26 (Roman Catholic Church, Lutheranism)

January 24 (some local calendars and pre-1970 General Roman Calendar)

1. Life

Timothy is mentioned in the Bible at the time of Paul's second visit to Lystra in Anatolia, where Timothy is mentioned as a "disciple". [2] Paul, impressed by his "own son in the faith," arranged that he should become his companion. Unlike Paul, Timothy had not however been circumcised, and Paul now ensured that this was done, according to the text, to ensure Timothy’s acceptability to the Jews. According to McGarvey [3] Paul performed the operation "with his own hand", but others claim this is unlikely and nowhere attested[citation needed]. He was ordained [4] and went with Paul on his journeys through Phrygia, Galatia, Mysia, Troas, Philippi, Veria, and Corinth. His mother, Eunice, and his grandmother, Lois, are noted as eminent for their piety and faith, [5] which indicates that they were also likely Jewish Christians. Timothy is praised by Paul for his knowledge of the Scriptures (in the 1st century mostly the Septuagint, see Development of the New Testament canon#Clement of Rome), and is said to have been acquainted with the Scriptures since childhood. [6] Little is known about Timothy's father; only that he was Greek. [7]

Rembrandt's Timothy and his grandmother, 1648.

According to later tradition, Paul consecrated Timothy as bishop of Ephesus in the year 65, where he served for 15 years. In the year 80 (though some sources place the event during the year 97, with Timothy dying at age 80), Timothy tried to halt a pagan procession of idols, ceremonies, and songs. In response to his preaching of the gospel, the angry pagans beat him, dragged him through the streets, and stoned him to death. In the 4th century, his relics were transferred to the Church of the Holy Apostles in Constantinople.

2. Veneration

Timothy is venerated as an apostle, saint and martyr by the Eastern Orthodox Church, with his feast day on 22 January. The Roman Catholic calendar of saints venerates Timothy together with Titus with a memorial on 26 January. In the General Roman Calendar of 1962, his feast, a third class, is kept on 24 January. Along with Titus and Silas, he is commemorated by the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America and the Episcopal Church on 26 January. Timothy's feast is kept by the Lutheran Church - Missouri Synod on 24 January.

3. References - Origin and Meaning of Timothy

2.Acts 16:1-2.

3.McGarvey on Acts 16: "Yet we see him in the case before us, circumcising Timothy with his own hand, and this "on account of certain Jews who were in those quarters." "

4.1 Timothy 4:14

5.2nd Timothy 1:5

6.2nd Timothy 3:15

7.Acts 16:1.

4. External links

•The Life, Miracles & Martyrdom of St. Timothy, Bishop of the Christian Church

Titus was a companion of Saint Paul, mentioned in several of the Pauline epistles. Titus was with Paul and Barnabas at Antioch and accompanied them to the Council of Jerusalem, [1] although his name occurs nowhere in the Acts of the Apostles.

He appears to have been a Gentile - for Paul sternly refused to have him circumcised, because Paul believed Christ's gospel freed believers from the requirements of the 613 Mitzvot — and to have been chiefly engaged in ministering to Gentiles. At a later period, Paul's epistles place him with Paul and Timothy at Ephesus, whence he was sent by Paul to Corinth, Greece for the purpose of getting the contributions of the church there on behalf of the poor Christians at Jerusalem sent forward. [2] He rejoined Paul when he was in Macedonia, and cheered him with the tidings he brought from Corinth. [3] After this his name is not mentioned until after Paul's first imprisonment, when he was engaged in the organization of the church in Crete, where Paul had left him for this purpose. [4] The last notice of him is in 2 Timothy 4:10, where he leaves Paul in Rome in order to travel to Dalmatia. The New Testament does not record his death.

According to tradition, Paul ordained Titus bishop of Gortyn in Crete. He died in the year 107, aged about 95.

It has been argued that the name "Titus" in 2 Corinthians and Galatians is nothing more than an informal name used by Timothy, implied already by the fact that even though both are said to be long-term close companions of Paul, they never appear in common scenes. [5] The theory proposes that a number of passages—1 Cor. 4:17, 16.10; 2 Cor. 2:13, 7:6, 13-14, 12:18; and Acts 19.22—all refer to the same journey of a single individual, Titus-Timothy. 2 Timothy seems to dispute this, by claiming that Titus has gone to Dalmatia. [6]

The feast day of Titus was not included in the Tridentine Calendar. When added in 1854, it was assigned to 6 February. [7] In 1969, the Roman Catholic Church assigned the feast to 26 January so as to celebrate the two disciples of Paul, Titus and Timothy, on the day after the feast of the Conversion of St. Paul. [8] The Evangelical Lutheran Church in America celebrates these two, together with Silas, on the same date. The Orthodox Church commemorates him on 25 August and on 4 January.

His relics, now consisting of only his skull, are venerated in the Church of St. Titus, Heraklion, Crete to which it was returned in 1966 [9] after being removed to Venice during the Turkish occupation.

Saint Titus

Bishop and Martyr

Born 1st century AD

Died 96 or 107 AD

Gortyn, Crete

Venerated in Roman Catholic Church

Eastern Orthodox Churches

Eastern Catholic Churches


Anglican Communion

Canonized Pre-Congregation

Major shrine Heraklion, Crete

Feast January 26

February 6 (General Roman Calendar 1845-1969)

1. References

1.Galatians 2:1-3; Acts 15:2

2.2 Corinthians 8:6; 12:18


4.Titus 1:5

5.Fellows, Richard G. "Was Titus Timothy?" Journal for the Study of the New Testament 81 (2001):33-58. 2 Timothy 4:10

7.Calendarium Romanum (Libreria Editrice Vaticana, 1969), p. 86

8.Calendarium Romanum (Libreria Editrice Vaticana, 1969), p. 116

9.The Orthodox Messenger, v. 8(7/8), July/Aug 1997

Saint Silas or Saint Silvanus (Greek: Σίλας / Σιλουανός; fl. 1st century AD) was a leading member of the Early Christian community, who later accompanied Paul in some of his missionary journeys.

There is some disagreement over the proper form of his name: he is consistently called "Silas" in Acts, but the Latin Silvanus, which means "of the forest", is always used by Paul and in the First Epistle of Peter; it may be that "Silvanus" is the Romanized version of the original "Silas", or that "Silas" is the Greek nickname for "Silvanus". Fitzmyer points out that Silas is the Greek version of the Aramaic "Seila", a version of the Hebrew "Saul", which is attested in Palmyrene inscriptions. [1] The name Latin "Silvanus" may be derived from pre-Roman Italian languages (see, e.g., the character "Asilas", an Etruscan leader and warrior-prophet who plays a prominent role in assisting Aeneas in Virgil's epic poem the Aeneid).[citation needed]

St. Silas is currently commemorated in the Calendar of Saints of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America on January 26 with Timothy and the Apostle Titus, and separately on July 13 by the Roman Catholic Church and February 10 by the Lutheran Church - Missouri Synod.

Saint Silas

Bishop and Martyr

Died c. AD 50


Venerated in Roman Catholic Church, Eastern Catholic Churches, Eastern Orthodoxy, Oriental Orthodoxy, Anglicanism, and Lutheranism

Feast January 26 (Evangelical Lutheran Church in America)

February 10 (Lutheran Church - Missouri Synod)

July 13 (Roman Martyrology)

July 30 (Eastern Orthodoxy)

July 13 (Syriac, Malankara Calendars)

1. See also

•Nag Hammadi library

2. References

1.Fitzmyer, Joseph J. (1998). The Anchor Bible: The Acts of the Apostles. New York: Doubleday. p. 564. ISBN 0385490208.

Scriptural Readings:

Psalm 27:7-14

Hear, O Lord, when I cry aloud, be gracious to me and answer me!

8“Come,” my heart says, “seek his face!” Your face, Lord, do I seek.

9Do not hide your face from me. Do not turn your servant away in anger, you who have been my help. Do not cast me off, do not forsake me, O God of my salvation!

10If my father and mother forsake me, the Lord will take me up.

11Teach me your way, O Lord, and lead me on a level path because of my enemies.

12Do not give me up to the will of my adversaries, for false witnesses have risen against me, and they are breathing out violence.

13I believe that I shall see the goodness of the Lord in the land of the living.

14Wait for the Lord; be strong, and let your heart take courage; wait for the Lord!

Genesis 49:1-2, 8-13, 21-26

49Then Jacob called his sons, and said: “Gather around, that I may tell you what will happen to you in days to come. 2Assemble and hear, O sons of Jacob; listen to Israel your father.

8Judah, your brothers shall praise you; your hand shall be on the neck of your enemies; your father’s sons shall bow down before you. 9Judah is a lion’s whelp; from the prey, my son, you have gone up. He crouches down, he stretches out like a lion, like a lioness—who dares rouse him up? 10The scepter shall not depart from Judah, nor the ruler’s staff from between his feet, until tribute comes to him; and the obedience of the peoples is his. 11Binding his foal to the vine and his donkey’s colt to the choice vine, he washes his garments in wine and his robe in the blood of grapes; 12his eyes are darker than wine, and his teeth whiter than milk.

13Zebulun shall settle at the shore of the sea; he shall be a haven for ships, and his border shall be at Sidon. 21Naphtali is a doe let loose that bears lovely fawns.

22Joseph is a fruitful bough, a fruitful bough by a spring; his branches run over the wall. 23The archers fiercely attacked him; they shot at him and pressed him hard. 24Yet his bow remained taut, and his arms were made agile by the hands of the Mighty One of Jacob, by the name of the Shepherd, the Rock of Israel, 25by the God of your father, who will help you, by the Almighty who will bless you with blessings of heaven above, blessings of the deep that lies beneath, blessings of the breasts and of the womb. 26The blessings of your father are stronger than the blessings of the eternal mountains, the bounties of the everlasting hills; may they be on the head of Joseph, on the brow of him who was set apart from his brothers.

Luke 1:67-79

67Then his father Zechariah was filled with the Holy Spirit and spoke this prophecy: 68“Blessed be the Lord God of Israel, for he has looked favorably on his people and redeemed them. 69He has raised up a mighty savior for us in the house of his servant David, 70as he spoke through the mouth of his holy prophets from of old, 71that we would be saved from our enemies and from the hand of all who hate us. 72Thus he has shown the mercy promised to our ancestors, and has remembered his holy covenant, 73the oath that he swore to our ancestor Abraham, to grant us 74that we, being rescued from the hands of our enemies, might serve him without fear, 75in holiness and righteousness before him all our days. 76And you, child, will be called the prophet of the Most High; for you will go before the Lord to prepare his ways, 77to give knowledge of salvation to his people by the forgiveness of their sins. 78By the tender mercy of our God, the dawn from on high will break upon us, 79to give light to those who sit in darkness and in the shadow of death, to guide our feet into the way of peace.”

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